THE BIRD CAGE THEATRE    TOMBSTONE ARIZONA
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The Weaver Brothers Saloon in Summit County, Colorado, 1890. The majority of saloon drinkers drank either warm beer or straight liquor like rye or bourbon. In an effort to improveprofits,
bar staff often cut their liquor with ammonia, gunpowder or even cayenne pepper.

Source: Getty Images

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Judge Roy Bean's eccentric saloon in Langtry, on the Texas/Mexico border, late 19th century. Bean was a local lawman who called himself 'The Law West of Pecos'. He had a very unique style of approaching law enforcement. It's claimed his first act as a lawman was to shoot up the saloon of a competitor. He would reportedly choose jurors for their bar customs
Source: Getty Images

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J W Swart's saloon in Charleston, South Carolina.
Source: Getty Images

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The fur-clad interior of the Table Bluff Hotel and Saloon in Table Bluff, northern California, 1889. Fur trappers and mountain men, such as those pictured, were instrumental in helping to scout out and organize wagon trails, which allowed people to immigrate out West. In the 19th century many were also attracted by the booming American fur trade.
Source: Getty Images

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Men gather for a drink at the Road House saloon in Bluff City, Alaska. As saloons spread throughout the west they began to specialize. By the end of the 19th century you could find gambling saloons, restaurant saloons, dance hall saloons, bowling saloons and brothel saloons.
Source: Getty Images

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